Breakout sessions

We have 3 breakout sessions:

  • Breakout session 1: Tuesday June 21, 14:30 – 15:30
  • Breakout session 2: Tuesday June 21, 16:00 – 17:00
  • Breakout session 3: Wednesday June 22, 11:30 – 12:30
Number Theme/Keywords Title Content Intended Audience Presenter(s)
1.1

Policy making
Competence
Quality
Development

Supported Employment in the Public Employment Service (PES) in Norway In this session we will share experiences with adapting Supported Employment in the Norwegian Public Employment Service and discuss how to implement the SE-methodology in everyday practice. Managers Team leaders Ane Stø, Senior Advisor, Unni Andersen, team manager, Elisabeth Harder, Senior Advisor, Maria Nyhagen, Senior Advisor, Public Employment Service, Norway Details
  • Number  : 1.1
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Policy making
    Competence
    Quality
    Development

  • Title  : Supported Employment in the Public Employment Service (PES) in Norway
  • Content  : In this session we will share experiences with adapting Supported Employment in the Norwegian Public Employment Service and discuss how to implement the SE-methodology in everyday practice.
  • Intended Audience  : Managers Team leaders
  • Presenter(s)  : Ane Stø, Senior Advisor, Unni Andersen, team manager, Elisabeth Harder, Senior Advisor, Maria Nyhagen, Senior Advisor, Public Employment Service, Norway
  • Session synopsis  : The Norwegian Public Employment Service has focused on Supported Employment and the five-stage process in developing our services to the public since 2017. We now have 600 employment specialists all over Norway in most municipalities. To develop and maintain good quality in the service and increase the competence for the employment specialist, we have developed a quality framework for implementing the best way to do SE within the Norwegian Public Employment Service. The framework is based on research and practitioners’ own experience. We believe SE needs to be adapted to the organisation where the service is provided, and that the Public Employment Service also needs to adapt to SE to secure quality in the service the clients are receiving.
1.2a

SE in a digital world
Innovation
Follow up services for employers
Digital skills
Supported Education
Lifelong learning

How job coaches transitioned to a digital job coaching in times of pandemic This presentation will provide data on the employment situation for people with learning difficulties during and after confinement. We will analyse what were the specific challenges we had to face, how we faced them and the outcomes we obtained. We will present the programs we have developed and which of these have remained after confinement and helped us improve our services. Mixed Laura Krauel, Psychologist, Responsible for the Job Placement Program for people with Intellectual Disabilities, Aura Foundation, Spain Details
  • Number  : 1.2a
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    SE in a digital world
    Innovation
    Follow up services for employers
    Digital skills
    Supported Education
    Lifelong learning

  • Title  : How job coaches transitioned to a digital job coaching in times of pandemic
  • Content  : This presentation will provide data on the employment situation for people with learning difficulties during and after confinement. We will analyse what were the specific challenges we had to face, how we faced them and the outcomes we obtained. We will present the programs we have developed and which of these have remained after confinement and helped us improve our services.
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Laura Krauel, Psychologist, Responsible for the Job Placement Program for people with Intellectual Disabilities, Aura Foundation, Spain
  • Session synopsis  : The digitalization of employment is an increasingly relevant reality in today's world. With the arrival of the pandemic this trend towards a digital world of work accelerated. In Spain there was a very extreme confinement that forced us job trainers to reinvent ourselves and become digital job coaches. All people served in our work program stopped going to their respective jobs, the vast majority did not have the possibility to do their work remotely, there was only a small percentage who could work from home. As job coaches, we had to respond to the very diverse work realities and demands, give emotional support to the people we serve, as well as provide information about the situation of the pandemic. This information had to be adapted to people with learning difficulties. As a result of this situation, we created a customized online training program (lifelong learning), where we worked on different subjects. Digital skills, guide for understanding government aids for workers unemployed due to covid, job monitoring and online training for those workers who were able to work from home, tailor-made training courses based on the different professional profiles related to the new safety and hygiene measures derived from the pandemic so that when they rejoin their jobs, they were able to do it safely. Online programs related to personal and emotional care were also carried out, such as physical exercise classes in different modalities, group and individual sessions on emotional well-being. Regarding the companies, the job coachers maintained permanent contact with them, advising about their workers and making periodic connections with the aura participants and their co-workers, to maintain the link, as well as to ensure that the participants could know first-hand the situation of their company and their colleagues. This transition to a digital job coach had to be done in record time, as well as how to generate new programs and forms of care for the people we serve. A year later there are some of these programs that have remained in time and some of the forms of online monitoring that, because of generating them out of necessity, have ended up remaining in our programs. Considering that we work with people with learning difficulties, become digital job coachers ourselves was a great challenge for all professionals and for all the people we serve
1.2b

SE in a digital world
Job Crafting
JOS-app
Job Fulfilment
Disability

The JOS-app, a digital Job crafting tool – a way to reduce challenges and barriers in the workplace We will present the results of our research regarding the JOS-app, a digital application especially developed for and by people with disabilities. By using this app, we want to inspire employers, job coaches and counsellors to engage and support employees in crafting their jobs. Mixed Charlotte Claes, Researcher, Odisee co-University, Brussels, Belgium Details
  • Number  : 1.2b
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    SE in a digital world
    Job Crafting
    JOS-app
    Job Fulfilment
    Disability

  • Title  : The JOS-app, a digital Job crafting tool – a way to reduce challenges and barriers in the workplace
  • Content  : We will present the results of our research regarding the JOS-app, a digital application especially developed for and by people with disabilities. By using this app, we want to inspire employers, job coaches and counsellors to engage and support employees in crafting their jobs.
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Charlotte Claes, Researcher, Odisee co-University, Brussels, Belgium
  • Session synopsis  : We will cover several topics in this presentation regarding job crafting: the challenges and barriers for people with a disability in the workplace, job crafting techniques, how to apply job crafting in a job, the advantages for employees & employers, the part of jobcoaches and employers and the job crafting app ‘JOS’ we created. People with a disability experience challenges and barriers on a daily basis, also in the workplace. They have lower chances to find a job and more often end up in less workable jobs. Research also shows that they rank lower on the scale of employability, which means that it is more difficult for them to find a long-term job that brings fulfilment and joy. Employers have an important responsibility to lower the barriers people with a disability run into, so that it is possible for them to execute their job properly. However, employees can also take the initiative and proactively shape their own job.How? With job crafting. Job crafting refers to employees proactively modifying aspects of their jobs to create a better fit between their job and their personal interests, competences and needs. Through job crafting people redesign their own job by making small adjustments. To do this successfully, it is necessary to take three important steps in the process of job crafting. First employees must know themselves and the tasks they do at work. Second, they must be conscious about whether they like a specific task and why. The third step is to know how they can craft their job. Literature describes four ways, which are structural job crafting, relational job crafting, contextual job crafting and cognitive job crafting. Job crafting brings a lot of advantages. Employees who craft their jobs score higher on job satisfaction, are more productive, creative, and motivated ánd are less absent due to illness. This is not only beneficial for them, but also for their employers. Employers and HR-professionals can play a big part in the job crafting behavior of their employees. By providing information, space, time, and tools, they create an environment in which employees are stimulated to start job crafting. Job coaches also have an important share in informing people on the possibilities of job crafting and in motivating and supporting them if necessary. There are several job crafting workshops and tools on the market. Unfortunately, these are not very accessible for people with a disability, mostly because of high costs and the aim at highly educated employees. We changed that. We developed JOS, an online job crafting app for people with a (mild intellectual) disability. We will present the results of our research and the lessons we learned. With this project we want to contribute to a world where everyone can craft their jobs and find fulfillment and joy in their professional lives.
1.3

Policy making
Pilot project
Non EU-member State

Pilot on SE for youth in North Macedonia 2019-2021 This session will introduce a Supported Employment pilot-project in North Macedonia and discuss how Supported Employment is adapted to North Macedonian conditions. Mixed Christoph Schreiner, Head of European Projects WienWork, Austria, Walter Schober, Head of Youth Coaching, WienWork, Austria Marina Tosheska, Local Action Group AGRO LIDER, North Macedonia Details
  • Number  : 1.3
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Policy making
    Pilot project
    Non EU-member State

  • Title  : Pilot on SE for youth in North Macedonia 2019-2021
  • Content  : This session will introduce a Supported Employment pilot-project in North Macedonia and discuss how Supported Employment is adapted to North Macedonian conditions.
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Christoph Schreiner, Head of European Projects WienWork, Austria, Walter Schober, Head of Youth Coaching, WienWork, Austria Marina Tosheska, Local Action Group AGRO LIDER, North Macedonia
  • Session synopsis  : The Pilot project on supported employment coaches for youth in North Macedonia 2019-2021 was a cooperation between five partner NGO´s in Nord Macedonia and WienWork/ Vienna supported by the Austrian Federal Ministry for Social Affairs, Health, Care and Consumer Protection and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). Those five NGOs (Agro Lider Prilep, Inkluziva Kumanovo, CDI Tetovo, YCC Gostivar, IZBOR Strumic are active in four different regions of North Macedonia. The main objective of the project was to implement 10 Supported Employment (SE) coaches at five NGOs in North Macedonia. Further project goals were the training of North Macedonian coaches in supported employment and case management techniques to enable the coaches to support people with disabilities and other vulnerable groups in their search for jobs, qualification measures or vocational training measures. Twenty people per Supported Employment Coach were identified, contacted and coached. A personal future plan including follow-up perspectives was made for each participant. Two internships or training courses in companies were initiated and accompanied per participant. Monitoring and quality standards for Supported Employment in Nord Macedonia have been developed. Cooperation with Companies and businesses in North Macedonia have been established. Cooperation between relevant public institutions such as the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs or the public employment service and the NGOs were established. Supported employment methods were implemented in North Macedonia. The project is particularly successful in applying supported employment methods to different target groups. Not only people with disabilities were supported, but also people with addiction problems or people with poor access to the labor market. Due to the Covid 19 pandemic, the project could not be carried out as planned. Online workshops and online coaching sessions for the North Macedonian Supported Employment Coaches replaced the originally planned face-to-face workshops. The study visit of the Supported Employment Coaches and representatives of the five cities of the participating NGOs in Vienna also had to be canceled. Nevertheless, the Project was very successful, due to the excellent work of the coaches and the North Macedonina NGOs. More than 160 participants have so far participated in the program. 150 career plans are made. More than 40 people got jobs in employment relationships, 39 placements in training courses and apprenticeships, 21 placements in school places and school graduation courses. Memoranda of Cooperation have been signed and partnerships have been established with Local Municipality's the centers for social work, the public employment services, schools, local businesses and companies. This project is therefore an excellent example of bilateral cooperation to implement Supported Employment.
1.4a

Job development
Job Deterioration
Assessment
Prevention
Intellectual Disability

Assessment and prevention of job deterioration in elder workers with Intellectual Disability In this session, we will discuss how to raise awareness about the effects of ageing on the employment of people with Intellectual Disabilities. We will present findings from international literature reviews. Mixed Francisco De Borja Jordan De Urries, Researcher/Professor Miguel Angel Verdugo, PhD. Researcher/Professor, INICO, University of Salamanca, Spain Details
  • Number  : 1.4a
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Job development
    Job Deterioration
    Assessment
    Prevention
    Intellectual Disability

  • Title  : Assessment and prevention of job deterioration in elder workers with Intellectual Disability
  • Content  : In this session, we will discuss how to raise awareness about the effects of ageing on the employment of people with Intellectual Disabilities. We will present findings from international literature reviews.
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Francisco De Borja Jordan De Urries, Researcher/Professor Miguel Angel Verdugo, PhD. Researcher/Professor, INICO, University of Salamanca, Spain
  • Session synopsis  : People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), for reasons arising from their disability, experience work ability decline more rapidly than the general population, which has a direct impact on their job. There is a need to focus on how this decline can be detected and what supports should be provided to mitigate it. To rigorously detect and identify the main areas and indicators of work ability decline in people with IDD, a systematic review has been carried out (following the recommendations of the PRISMA declaration) with the aim of answering the question of how to detect the work ability decline of a person with DID and what support to provide to mitigate it. The data sources consulted were PsyInfo, Academic Search Complete, ERIC, Medline, Cinhal Complete, PsycArticles, PsycBooks, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection and finally PsicoDoc. Regarding eligibility, the inclusion criteria used were the time interval 2000-2020 and access to full text. The only exclusion criterion was inappropriateness to the subject of the study. A total of 25 articles were collected (the main technique used was a semi-structured interview). The result reveals that there is little information on the occupational impairment of people with disabilities, especially in the regular employment sector. In addition, there is a lack of knowledge of the characteristics of occupational impairment and an absence of indicators that give an alarm signal about the onset of impairment and the non-existence of reliable methods of assessing occupational impairment. These results led to the need to review non-validated tools and other tools related to work capacity in the general population. After analyzing them, a prototype of a specific assessment tool has been constructed that can be used to determine a prevention protocol to prolong people's positive working lives for as long as possible. Using this prototype, a purposive nonprobability sample of 15 experts (38 - 60 years) was used in the Delphi process and 10 experts (40 - 55 years) in the research working group. This work has resulted in the creation of a tool, composed of 76 items, 6 dimensions, and 17 indicators, to assess work ability decline in people with IDD. This tool helps extend the satisfying working lives—with support—of people with IDD, promoting social inclusion and participation as workers and not as pensioners. Finally, the indicators identified can be used to develop prevention and/or intervention protocols for work ability decline and to produce guidance for the transition toward retirement, specifically for people with IDD. The future of this research should seek to analyze the functioning of the specific dimensions, indicators, and items, as well as other related factors (e.g., age, sex, type and degree of disability, participation in supported employment programs, participation in sheltered employment centers). The tool has been designed for longitudinal analysis to observe the evolution of the indicators and associated variables, and to analyze variations in the indicators of decline. This will also allow the tool to be consolidated by analyzing its psychometric properties and endorsing its structure.
1.4b

Job development
Employers attitudes
Barriers and facilitators to inclusive employment

Assessing Attitudes towards People with Disabilities in the Workplace Present the study: “The Employability of People with Disabilities – A survey with employers” Identify barriers and facilitators to inclusive employment Discuss what are the attitudes behind employers’ reactions to people with disabilities Discuss possible strategies to approach companies to increase the probability of employers hiring people with disabilities Employment Specialists Job coaches Counsellors Lucia Canha, Post-doc Researcher Celeste Simoes, Associate Professor, University of Lisbon, Portugal Details
  • Number  : 1.4b
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Job development
    Employers attitudes
    Barriers and facilitators to inclusive employment

  • Title  : Assessing Attitudes towards People with Disabilities in the Workplace
  • Content  : Present the study: “The Employability of People with Disabilities – A survey with employers” Identify barriers and facilitators to inclusive employment Discuss what are the attitudes behind employers’ reactions to people with disabilities Discuss possible strategies to approach companies to increase the probability of employers hiring people with disabilities
  • Intended Audience  : Employment Specialists Job coaches Counsellors
  • Presenter(s)  : Lucia Canha, Post-doc Researcher Celeste Simoes, Associate Professor, University of Lisbon, Portugal
  • Session synopsis  : The employment of people with disabilities remains a global challenge and a distant reality for many of these persons. The study “The Employability of People with Disabilities - A Survey with employers" seeks to gain a greater understanding of this phenomenon. The study, developed in Portugal aims to answers the question “how employers’ attitudes, characteristics of companies, and previous experience with persons with disabilities can influence the employer’s intentions to hire PWD?” Quantitative data were collected through a scale of attitudes toward workers with disabilities and by a set of demographic questions about the respondent and the company (e.g., company size, quality of previous experiences with PWD, business type, work or not work with a support organization). Two hundred and fifty-four persons from human resources (HR), upper management, and line managers were surveyed. Qualitative data were obtained through three focus groups involving forty persons from a diverse set of private companies and other employing organizations. Barriers and facilitators to the inclusion and professional integration of people with disabilities were identified. Results were analyzed and recommendations in terms of how employment specialists and job coaches can improve the inclusion and attitudes toward people with disabilities are made.
1.5

Job development

Developing SE for people with Intellectual Disabilities in Finland Present an overview of the SE-situation for People with Intellectual Disability in Finland Present tools on how to support job coaches in their jobs and how to promote SE and job job coaching to disability services and employers Group conversations and good practice example Mixed Jenni Kujansivu, Project Coordinator, Service Foundation for People with an Intellectual Disability Simo Klem, Expert Employment, Finnish Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Finland Details
  • Number  : 1.5
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Job development

  • Title  : Developing SE for people with Intellectual Disabilities in Finland
  • Content  : Present an overview of the SE-situation for People with Intellectual Disability in Finland Present tools on how to support job coaches in their jobs and how to promote SE and job job coaching to disability services and employers Group conversations and good practice example
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Jenni Kujansivu, Project Coordinator, Service Foundation for People with an Intellectual Disability Simo Klem, Expert Employment, Finnish Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Finland
  • Session synopsis  : In Finland only about 2 % of a people with intellectual disability (ID) work with salary and employment contract. The employment situation and job coaching services varies a lot depending on where in Finland you are. For people with ID sheltered work at ordinary work places (paid 0-12€/day) is still the most common way to work outside sheltered workshops. Most of the employed people with ID work part-time, because their main income is disability pension. In Finland people can combine disability pension and salary, but salary income is limited to 837,59 € per month (2021). Employ Me! (FAIDD) develops supported employment for people with ID nationwide and Let´s Hire -project (KVPS, ESF - European Social Fund 2021-2023) develops it locally in Pirkanmaa area. Employ me! and Let´s Hire -project support job coaches and disability service councellors in many different ways and promote supported employment to disability services in municipalities and to employers. Only a small modification to disability service councellor´s job approach can make a big difference towards finding a job to a person with ID. Increasing employers´s awareness of the employment potential of people with ID and knowledge of subsidies makes employment process easier. In Finland employers can apply pay subsidy and subsidy for arranging working conditions. Introducing also a real life employment story, where job coaching, modified work tasks and long term support to employee and employer is the key to a succesful employment. Individual placement and support really works!
1.6

Job development
Customized Employment
Lean
Employer Engagement

A Lean Approach to Customized Employment Discuss how Lean principles can be used to maximise the value in customizing employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities An overview of the five key Lean principles Discuss how to develop employment proposals utilizing the Lean process Mixed Laura Owens, Professor/President, TransCen Inc./University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, USA Details
  • Number  : 1.6
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Job development
    Customized Employment
    Lean
    Employer Engagement

  • Title  : A Lean Approach to Customized Employment
  • Content  : Discuss how Lean principles can be used to maximise the value in customizing employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities An overview of the five key Lean principles Discuss how to develop employment proposals utilizing the Lean process
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Laura Owens, Professor/President, TransCen Inc./University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, USA
  • Session synopsis  : While there is no magic formula for negotiating customized employment positions, there are some basic principles and strategies on how to negotiate. One of the challenges many professionals face is connecting with employers. Utilizing business strategies that can align with customized employment is important in developing jobs for individuals with significant disabilities. The Lean principles allow Employment Consultants to identify possible "waste" and areas of improvement in which a job seeker can add value to a business. Customized Employment creates a “win/win” employment opportunity by matching the contributions of job seekers with the unmet needs of business. The Lean process is a method for creating a more effective business by eliminating wasteful practices and improving efficiency. The Lean process has principles that focus on improving products and services based on what customers and employers want and value. While the Lean process has its roots in manufacturing, the principles align well with customized employment. This presentation will discuss how Lean principles can be used to maximize the value in customizing employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities. Lean principles can guide Employment Consultants by working with employers to identify opportunities for improvement, implement changes, and measure the impact of those changes, leading to long term workforce return on investment through customized employment
1.7

Career development
Person Centred Planning
Positive Psychology
Supported Decision making

What about tomorrow? Personal Future Planning – the next steps of a personal career This workshop will introduce you to the wide range of creative personal future planning tools that you can use in the process of career planning or developing a vocational profile. There will be demonstration of some tools and exchange of experiences between participants Mixed Stefan Doose, Professor for Integration and Inclusion, Potsdam University of Applied Science, Germany Details
  • Number  : 1.7
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Career development
    Person Centred Planning
    Positive Psychology
    Supported Decision making

  • Title  : What about tomorrow? Personal Future Planning – the next steps of a personal career
  • Content  : This workshop will introduce you to the wide range of creative personal future planning tools that you can use in the process of career planning or developing a vocational profile. There will be demonstration of some tools and exchange of experiences between participants
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Stefan Doose, Professor for Integration and Inclusion, Potsdam University of Applied Science, Germany
  • Session synopsis  : Personal future planning as we call it in Germany also known as person centred planning explores the values and virtues, the dreams and the goals, the interests and the strengths, the personal network, and the community of a person often with a circle of support to create for example a meaningful personal career. Within two European Projects “New Path to Inclusion” (2009-2011) and “New Path to Inclusion Network” (2013-2015) we developed with the help of John O’Brien, Beth Mount, Helen Sanderson an inclusive training in person centred planning with 6 modules in the participating European Countries. Since then, over 50 training courses were held alone in the German speaking countries. We also founded a German speaking network of person-centred planning (Netzwerk Persönliche Zukunftsplanung) with now over 300 members in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxemburg and Italy. The network allowed us to exchange and further develop the methods. In the last years were also inspired by the research and methods of the field of positive psychology. The research in the field of positive psychology in the past years shows the importance of a positive diagnosis and a strength and value-based approach. Many supported employment services in Germany use parts of the personal future planning toolbox. This workshop will introduce you to the wide range of creative personal future planning tools that you can use in the process of career planning or developing a vocational profile. We will try out some of them and exchange experiences in what is helpful for a strengthening career planning process. You will also get to know what a funny hat I bought in Oslo while I was at the EUSE conference here 24 years ago has to do with the benefit of trying out new roles in the community.
1.8a

Career development
School
Inclusion
Apprenticeships

Supported Education – how can school facilitate for work inclusion of youth with disabilities? This presentation will discuss how the school’s structure in some cases exclude young people from inclusion in school and working life. The presenters will point out the importance of thinking early relations to working life where ordinary work and ordinary pay are the goals Mixed Annlaug Bragdø and May Helen Austad, Supervisors Agder County Council, Norway Details
  • Number  : 1.8a
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Career development
    School
    Inclusion
    Apprenticeships

  • Title  : Supported Education – how can school facilitate for work inclusion of youth with disabilities?
  • Content  : This presentation will discuss how the school’s structure in some cases exclude young people from inclusion in school and working life. The presenters will point out the importance of thinking early relations to working life where ordinary work and ordinary pay are the goals
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Annlaug Bragdø and May Helen Austad, Supervisors Agder County Council, Norway
  • Session synopsis  : Describe how we in our school system have opportunities to provide young people with challenges, both education and relationship to working life to succeed with work inclusion. Factors that promote and inhibit this inclusion will be presented and exemplified.
1.8b

Career development
SE in different organizational settings
Individual Choice and Autonomy
Care experienced
unaccompanied minors

SE for young people in disadvantaged situations By this presentation we aim to share our learning around what works when supporting care experienced, unaccompanied minors and socially disadvantaged young people (e.g young people not in education, employment or training, immigrants, and refugees). Our project: The Give and Take scheme, a supported pre-employability programme helps disadvantaged young people to progress into and sustain their place within mainstream employment, education and training Mixed Deborah Burns and Dominic Mooney, Senior Youth Workers, Include Youth, UK Details
  • Number  : 1.8b
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Career development
    SE in different organizational settings
    Individual Choice and Autonomy
    Care experienced
    unaccompanied minors

  • Title  : SE for young people in disadvantaged situations
  • Content  : By this presentation we aim to share our learning around what works when supporting care experienced, unaccompanied minors and socially disadvantaged young people (e.g young people not in education, employment or training, immigrants, and refugees). Our project: The Give and Take scheme, a supported pre-employability programme helps disadvantaged young people to progress into and sustain their place within mainstream employment, education and training
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Deborah Burns and Dominic Mooney, Senior Youth Workers, Include Youth, UK
  • Session synopsis  : Why is there a need for our the Give and Take scheme, the history behind the establishment of the Give and Take scheme, and why the scheme works for care experienced, unaccompanied minors, and socially disadvantaged young people. The development of the service, our contracts with the trusts all across NI, and how we started under ESF moving out into communities and schools etc. Highlighting the main 5 components of the Give and Take scheme: Personal development, training and qualifications, work experience, mentoring, and transitional support. Through experience, we have found that these components are all essential in the development of the young people we work with. We will showcase some case studies that demonstrate the hybrid model when supporting unaccompanied minors but also talking about some of the challenges with this work, discussion with the delegates around hearing their experiences and what works for them in the hope that we can all learn from each other's experiences. Our session will include case studies, videos and be as interactive as is possible depending on the size of the group.
2.1a

Policy making
SE in different political and organizational frameworks
SE for people in disadvantaged situations
Implementation of new practices

Social Work in Transition – implementing SE in Danish Employment Services Presentation of a study that follows 12 social workers in their transition from working within a traditional job function in Danish Municipal Job Centres toward working across job functions as job coaches in a SE-intervention targeting NEETs with mental health problems Mixed Inge Bonfils, Senior Associate Professor/PhD, Copenhagen University College, Denmark Others to be confirmed Details
  • Number  : 2.1a
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Policy making
    SE in different political and organizational frameworks
    SE for people in disadvantaged situations
    Implementation of new practices

  • Title  : Social Work in Transition – implementing SE in Danish Employment Services
  • Content  : Presentation of a study that follows 12 social workers in their transition from working within a traditional job function in Danish Municipal Job Centres toward working across job functions as job coaches in a SE-intervention targeting NEETs with mental health problems
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Inge Bonfils, Senior Associate Professor/PhD, Copenhagen University College, Denmark Others to be confirmed
  • Session synopsis  : In Denmark, the employment services are traditionally organized in accordance with the administrative client categories defined by law. This has led to functional differentiation of job functions between statutory tasks, employer contact, and mentoring (Andersen & Larsen, 2018). This study follows 12 social workers in their transition from working within a traditional job function in Danish municipal job centers towards working across job functions as job coaches in a supported employment intervention, targeted NEETs struggling with mental health problems. The study runs from 2019 – 2023 and is part of a broader research project: The Reconnect project. The study is conducted using a combination of qualitative methods: mapping the professionals previous job functions, focus group interviews, individual interviews, and observational studies. Data is analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Preliminary findings suggest that the social workers value working within a client-centered approach, and experience having the necessary time and flexibility to develop strong relations with the target group. Social workers report a sense of wholeness; they get to work with the client within the context of their whole lives. However, they also face challenges that are particularly related to the demands for doing statutory work and documentation. Overall, the study points to that the social workers develop new professional identities reflected in the role as job coaches and counselors in the framework of a supported employment intervention.
2.1b

Policy making
SE in France
SE Post Covid
Skills of Employment Specialists

Implementation of Supported Employment in France: An Evaluative Study of 27 Services and the Skills of their Employment Specialists Presentation of the implementation of SE in France, through the study of 27 services, spread over France Mixed Marie-Gaëlle Marec, Psychologist/Phd student and Bernard Pachoud, professor, University of Paris, France Details
  • Number  : 2.1b
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Policy making
    SE in France
    SE Post Covid
    Skills of Employment Specialists

  • Title  : Implementation of Supported Employment in France: An Evaluative Study of 27 Services and the Skills of their Employment Specialists
  • Content  : Presentation of the implementation of SE in France, through the study of 27 services, spread over France
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Marie-Gaëlle Marec, Psychologist/Phd student and Bernard Pachoud, professor, University of Paris, France
  • Session synopsis  : Supported employment was developed late in France due to a lack of funding for this innovative practice. The situation has just changed, as the public authorities have decided to promote this practice and to finance at least one supported employment service per department since 2018. 1) Characterization of services Our evaluation study covers 27 services, representing about one third of the services existing in France. Almost all of the services refer to the IPS model, and many of them have received specific training in this approach, which was not expected because it was not requested by the funder. This relative closeness to the IPS model is reflected in the satisfactory scores on the IPS 25 scale, with profiles that are less heterogeneous than might be expected for a recent practice. A clustering analysis allows us to identify 4 groups of services according to their degree of fidelity to the principles of the IPS model and characteristic items of their practice and organization. Among these 4 groups, 2 stand out for their performance in terms of integration and job retention of the persons supported. The skills and knowledge of the referents (N=71) in each group were evaluated with the Behaviors, Attitudes and Knowledge of Employment Specialists Scale (BAKES) (Corbière & al., 2007). The two best performing groups of services are also the two groups with the highest skill scale scores. Our qualitative investigation makes it possible to specify the values prioritized by the services to guide their practices, as well as the factors that they believe contribute most to the effectiveness of their practice. The employment counselors also indicated which skills they considered most useful in promoting access to and retention in employment. Finally, it appears that "remote" support during periods of restricted contact due to covid crisis allowed for fairly good continuity of follow-up and the development of new ways of being in contact. 2) SE service performance (for the year 2020): In 2020, 1337 people were supported by the 27 services that responded to the study (an average of 49 per services). Psychological disability. Mental disability. TSA Number of people supported 1027 (77%) 215 (16%) 95 (7%) Integration (number of people) 527 106 43 Rate of integration after one year 51,31% 49,30%. 45,26% Retention (number of people) 325 70 30 Retention rate 61,67% 66,04% 69,77% " Integration " refers to the number of individuals who were employed for at least 1 day during the year, while "Retention" refers to the number of individuals who remained employed for at least 6 months during the year. "ASD: Autism Spectrum Disorder. The level of performance of the services is therefore in line with international research data, with a good rate of job retention, even though most of the services have been in existence for less than three years. The slightly lower access rate for intellectual disability and ASD is compensated for by a better job retention rate, which is also regularly noted in the literature.
2.2a

Policy making
Entrepreneurship
Labour inclusion
Self-employment
Intellectual Disability

I want to be my boss Demonstrate how to promote the entrepreneurment of people with Intellectual Disabilities through the project “La Inclusivadora” Support people to develop a personal project Mixed Marc Badia Muntane, Labour Inclusion Services Coordinator and Saül Sanz Piqué, Project Manager of Entrepreneurship, Catalan Foundation of Down Syndrome, Spain Details
  • Number  : 2.2a
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Policy making
    Entrepreneurship
    Labour inclusion
    Self-employment
    Intellectual Disability

  • Title  : I want to be my boss
  • Content  : Demonstrate how to promote the entrepreneurment of people with Intellectual Disabilities through the project “La Inclusivadora” Support people to develop a personal project
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Marc Badia Muntane, Labour Inclusion Services Coordinator and Saül Sanz Piqué, Project Manager of Entrepreneurship, Catalan Foundation of Down Syndrome, Spain
  • Session synopsis  : During the session, we are going to talk about: 1. Who we are (FCSD)? 1.1 History 1.2 Services (LIS and CPS) 2. What is the project "Inclusivadora"? 3. How it works? 3.1. Entrepreneurship 3.2. Coworking 3.3. Fablab 3.4. Talents 4. Objectives 5. New challenges and SDG
2.2b

Job development Social enterprise Multidisability team Diversity management

Supported employment as a diversity management tool in a social enterprise team with multiple disabilities The objectives of the presentation relates to the extension of supported employment method as a tool providing the best solutions for managing the multidisability team that has to function in business environment. Especially useful are different actions developed at the 5th stage of EUSE supported employment: On and off job support and at the 4th stage know as employer engagement. As social enterprise by definition relies on work of persons with disability it means that the managers of such a businesses should take into considerations know-how of the methods designed for placing PwD into the job market. Mixed Marta Gawryluk and Dorota Składzień, the Eudajmonia Foundation, member organization of the Polish Union of Supported Employment, Rafal Dziurla, Psychologist, Job Coach, Polish Union of Supported Employment Details
  • Number  : 2.2b
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Job development Social enterprise Multidisability team Diversity management

  • Title  : Supported employment as a diversity management tool in a social enterprise team with multiple disabilities
  • Content  : The objectives of the presentation relates to the extension of supported employment method as a tool providing the best solutions for managing the multidisability team that has to function in business environment. Especially useful are different actions developed at the 5th stage of EUSE supported employment: On and off job support and at the 4th stage know as employer engagement. As social enterprise by definition relies on work of persons with disability it means that the managers of such a businesses should take into considerations know-how of the methods designed for placing PwD into the job market.
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Marta Gawryluk and Dorota Składzień, the Eudajmonia Foundation, member organization of the Polish Union of Supported Employment, Rafal Dziurla, Psychologist, Job Coach, Polish Union of Supported Employment
  • Session synopsis  : According to EU: Social enterprises combine societal goals with an entrepreneurial spirit. In our presentation we would like to present the challenges of employment of persons with variety of disabilities in accordance with fulling the company goals. Our social enterprise is directed towards accessibility of persons with disability in various areas of social life in Poland. According to a new legislation till the year 2022 all state owned companies, offices etc. has to be audited towards different areas of accessibility e.g. architectural, organizational, digital etc. In our social enterprise accessibility audit is provided by persons with different disabilities such as vision impairment, ASD, psychological disability and hearing impairment. Differentiation of functioning of such a team could be an asset and burden at the same time. The managing challenges relates to providing each employee with carefully devised support. Therefore the use of supported employment (SE) methodology could be especially helpful as it relies on many years of experience. We have found especially useful methods used at the 5th and 4th stage of SE. Job matching is one of central part especially with the SE techniques as job curving, job enrichment and job stripping which should be used not only towards one employee but the manager has to take into consideration possibilities and limitations of other disabilities as the overall goal is to establish well performing team operating on the open labor market. We would like to present our solutions to the described problem and relate them to the performance level of our employees. As we provided qualitative measurement of our actions taken we can analyze the outcomes of our diversity management program. AS an conclusion we can state that supported employment method could be use as team building strategy for multidisability teams in business settings.
2.3

Policy making Diversity
SE in different countries
Individual Choice and autonomy

Now Is The Time – Social Return on Investment Share, highlight and debate the Social Return om Investment an the Invest to Save case for supporting people with learning disabilities and autism into paid employment Present the Social Return on Investment evaluation of DFN Project SEARCH Present up-to-date calculations around the savings to different areas of the UK economy when people gain full-time paid employment Explore the investment required to provide strong “follow-along” support and debate the impact this can have on long-term employment outcomes Mixed Claire Cookson, Chief Executive Officer, DFN Project SEARCH, UK Details
  • Number  : 2.3
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Policy making Diversity
    SE in different countries
    Individual Choice and autonomy

  • Title  : Now Is The Time – Social Return on Investment
  • Content  : Share, highlight and debate the Social Return om Investment an the Invest to Save case for supporting people with learning disabilities and autism into paid employment Present the Social Return on Investment evaluation of DFN Project SEARCH Present up-to-date calculations around the savings to different areas of the UK economy when people gain full-time paid employment Explore the investment required to provide strong “follow-along” support and debate the impact this can have on long-term employment outcomes
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Claire Cookson, Chief Executive Officer, DFN Project SEARCH, UK
  • Session synopsis  : Within this session we will explore what we believe to be the ‘Social Return on Investment’ and the ‘Invest to Save’ case for supporting people with learning disabilities and autism into paid employment. Drawing on data that we have collected within DFN Project SEARCH, as well as external research that we have supported, we will delve into these savings at a local and national level and consider what these savings mean to different stakeholders. We will also explore the impact on families, business, and the community when adults with learning disabilities and autism gain full-time paid employment. We will also explore the benefits of long-term follow-along support, how this can be achieved as well as how we can capture that through data collection and analysis. We will bring this to life with some case studies of graduates from the DFN Project SEARCH programme and explore the business model for an ‘embedded job coach’. This session aims to stimulate discussion regarding future research ideas and the most effective ways to use this to create systemic change.
2.4

Job development
Active caseload management
Lifelong guidance
Coaching in duo

Screw it! Let’s do it! How to deal with guidelines and criteria if you want to put people first? Discussion on how to manage a caseload considering the IPS criteria: zero exclusion, intensive support and guidance, a maximum caseload of 20 participants Sharing experiences with audience interactively Mixed Koenraad Sibbens, and Frederik Verhaeghe, IPS-coaches, GTB, Belgium Details
  • Number  : 2.4
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Job development
    Active caseload management
    Lifelong guidance
    Coaching in duo

  • Title  : Screw it! Let’s do it! How to deal with guidelines and criteria if you want to put people first?
  • Content  : Discussion on how to manage a caseload considering the IPS criteria: zero exclusion, intensive support and guidance, a maximum caseload of 20 participants Sharing experiences with audience interactively
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Koenraad Sibbens, and Frederik Verhaeghe, IPS-coaches, GTB, Belgium
  • Session synopsis  : Screw it, let’s do it! How to deal with guidelines and criteria if you want to put people first? How to manage an active caseload? Sharing experiences on coaching in duo.
2.5

Job development Diversity
Co-delivery
Innovation
Challenging Assumptions

The Apt Disability Employment Gap PSP: An Employer-Facing Approach to Achieving Sustainable Change This workshop will increase awareness of how to work in partnership with employers to develop and deliver a range of innovative projects that address the knowledge and expertise gaps they have, to enable them to improve the employment prospects available to disabled people. Outcomes of the Workshop: Increased awareness of what a PSP Project is and why is it needed Enhanced understanding of some common myths v the actual benefits associated with employing disabled people Increased knowledge about how to inculcate positive change in employer processes and attitudes Understand how to embed delivery into a joined-up employability support service Increased awareness of how to involve people with lived experience now and in the future Mixed David Stewart, Apt PSP Project Manager David Cameron, CEO, The Scottish Union of Supported Employment (SUSE), Scotland Details
  • Number  : 2.5
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Job development Diversity
    Co-delivery
    Innovation
    Challenging Assumptions

  • Title  : The Apt Disability Employment Gap PSP: An Employer-Facing Approach to Achieving Sustainable Change
  • Content  : This workshop will increase awareness of how to work in partnership with employers to develop and deliver a range of innovative projects that address the knowledge and expertise gaps they have, to enable them to improve the employment prospects available to disabled people. Outcomes of the Workshop: Increased awareness of what a PSP Project is and why is it needed Enhanced understanding of some common myths v the actual benefits associated with employing disabled people Increased knowledge about how to inculcate positive change in employer processes and attitudes Understand how to embed delivery into a joined-up employability support service Increased awareness of how to involve people with lived experience now and in the future
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : David Stewart, Apt PSP Project Manager David Cameron, CEO, The Scottish Union of Supported Employment (SUSE), Scotland
  • Session synopsis  : SUSE is the lead partner in the Apt PSP which has been commissioned by the Scottish Government. A PSP is a strategic partnering arrangement which gives the third sector the opportunity to design future public services by trying/piloting new ideas and approaches. The Apt PSP is a unique and forward-thinking initiative in the Scottish employability landscape that aims to contribute to the ambition set by the Scottish Government in The Fairer Scotland for Disabled People - Employment Action Plan, to half the Disability Employment Gap by 2038. The driver for the policy includes three themes: Supporting employers to recruit and retain disabled people Supporting disabled people to enter work Young people and transitions (Disabled young people are more than twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled young people) This workshop will explore how the PSP is providing the missing piece in the employability jigsaw. By working in partnership with forward-thinking, inclusive and creative employers, we are communicating and demonstrating the benefits their organisation can receive as a result of recruiting, retaining and developing disabled people. We will highlight the methods we have designed and are currently implementing to raise the confidence and capacity of employers to: Increase the talent pool their vacancies reach Create a workforce that reflects the diversity of their customers Benefit from additional skills that are currently being missed Reduce employee turnover, saving money on recruitment and training Improve their corporate culture Tackle the myths associated with recruiting disabled people Easily implement reasonable adjustments Become Diversity Champions We will also discuss ambitious plans to establish a Centre of Excellence for Scotland – a self-funded enterprise that employs disabled people to provide consultation and guidance to employers in order to increase the inclusiveness/accessibility of their workforce and to generate commercial income.
2.6

Career development
Education and training
SE in Schools

Training of schools to embed and deliver Supported Employment with students Present how SE can be used with Special Educational Needs or Disabilities (SEND) students whilst still in education, raising employment aspirations from an early age Demonstrate our journey to designing and delivering a consultancy, training and mentoring package for all schools and colleges Discuss the value of supporting education providers to embed the SE model Mixed David Stenning, SE Manager and Alicia Moyles, Head of Service The Education People, Specialist Employment Service, UK Details
  • Number  : 2.6
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Career development
    Education and training
    SE in Schools

  • Title  : Training of schools to embed and deliver Supported Employment with students
  • Content  : Present how SE can be used with Special Educational Needs or Disabilities (SEND) students whilst still in education, raising employment aspirations from an early age Demonstrate our journey to designing and delivering a consultancy, training and mentoring package for all schools and colleges Discuss the value of supporting education providers to embed the SE model
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : David Stenning, SE Manager and Alicia Moyles, Head of Service The Education People, Specialist Employment Service, UK
  • Session synopsis  : This workshop sets out the need for education providers to support their students with Special Educational Need and Disabilities (SEND) to prepare for appropriate and sustainable employment. The service provides professional expertise to embed an adapted Supported Employment model into schools. Schools are enabled to support SEND and other vulnerable students to access professional careers guidance, quality person-centred work experience, pre-work skills, Internships, Apprenticeships and paid employment along with professional in-work support where needed. This is in line with the UK governments Preparing for Adulthood guidance, the Gatsby Benchmarks, Written Statement of Action. The programme supports the school to have the knowledge and tools to successfully support SEND students to reach their aspirations and career goals. The audience will be able to recognise the value of supporting education providers to embed The Supported Employment model by: Understanding the value of the Supported Employment model and embed it into their existing careers strategy Recognising how to support a student and prepare them for sustainable employment that meets the individuals needs Facilitating appropriate engagement with employers to gain trust and build lasting relationships. Maximising results with employers whilst minimising time spent on the task Job coaching efficiently in the work placement to successfully fade support from both the employer and the student.
2.7

Career development
Career Guidance
Job development
Client’s Perspective
Lived Experience
Improving SE

#anICFwonthurt – playful introduction to the ICF as a language to support the process of job coaching A gameful introduction to: The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) How to collect work- and health related information in the framework of the ICF in order to clarify the strengths and goals of the client Mixed Pieter Vaes and Stien Hennaert, Job Coaches, GTB, Belgium Details
  • Number  : 2.7
  • Theme/Keywords  :

    Career development
    Career Guidance
    Job development
    Client’s Perspective
    Lived Experience
    Improving SE

  • Title  : #anICFwonthurt – playful introduction to the ICF as a language to support the process of job coaching
  • Content  : A gameful introduction to: The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) How to collect work- and health related information in the framework of the ICF in order to clarify the strengths and goals of the client
  • Intended Audience  : Mixed
  • Presenter(s)  : Pieter Vaes and Stien Hennaert, Job Coaches, GTB, Belgium
  • Session synopsis  : 4 teams with several participants (max 20 per session): - Team Mary (client) - Team family - Team jobcoach - Team employer On the floor are large game tiles (info – bad luck – lucky you – give your opinion). Each team rolls the dice alternately and depending on the tile, the game leader initiates an action - Info: we share a fact about the ICF and discuss this in the group. - Give your opinion: we ask a question and give the participants a several possible answers. We will discuss the output in the group. - Lucky you: success stories, strengths or facilitators are described from the perspective of the client, the family, the jobcoach and the employer (depending on the game tile). We will reflect on the information and write it down in the ICF framework (5 components). - Bad luck: Difficult situations or problems in functions are told from the perspective of the client, the family, the jobcoach and the employer (depending on the game tile). We will reflect on the information and write it down in the ICF framework (5 components). At the end of the game, when we have collected a lot of information about our client 'Mary', the goal is to reflect on Mary's story based on the information in the ICF framework and to talk about strenghts, solutions, goals and an action plan.

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